Monday, August 24, 2015

SADC Industrialization Strategy & Roadmap 2015 - 2063

The SADC Industrialization Strategy and Roadmap 2015 - 2063 is the first of its kind. It has a long term perspective, and is aligned to national, regional, continental and international dimensions.The Strategy recognizes that for trade liberalization to contribute to sustainable and equitable develop¬ment, and thus to poverty reduction, it must be complimented by the requisite capacities to produce, and to trade effectively and efficiently.

The primary orientation of the Strategy is the importance of technological and economic transformation of the SADC region through industrialization, modernization, skills development, science and technology, financial strengthening and deeper regional integration. The Strategy is anchored on three pillars namely; industrialization as champion of economic and technological transformation; competi¬tiveness as an active process to move from comparative advantage to competitive advantage; and regional integration and geography as the context for industrial development and economic prosperity.

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Okavango Delta World Heritage Site Listing: Opportunities and Challenges


As part of the celebrations for the recent listing of the Okavango Delta as a World Heritage Site, the Okavango Research Institute will be holding a Panel Discussion, on Thursday 20th August on the challenges and opportunities of this listing.

More details about the event can be found on the flyer below.


You  are cordially invited to attend.

Friday, August 14, 2015

POWER PEOPLE PLANET : Seizing Africa’s energy and climate opportunities

For Sub-Saharan Africa, 2015 is a turning point. The summits on sustainable development, financing and climate change are swinging the spotlight not only onto Africa’s needs to accelerate development and adapt to global warming, but also onto the region’s urgent energy crisis. Two in three Africans lack access to electricity.

But this crisis is also a moment of great opportunity, as we demonstrate in the Africa Progress Report 2015, Power People Planet: Seizing Africa’s Energy and Climate Opportunities. Demand for modern energy is set to surge, fuelled by economic growth, demographic change and urbanisation. As the costs of low-carbon energy fall, Africa could leapfrog into a new era of power generation. Utility reform, new technologies and new business models could be as transformative in energy as the mobile phone has been in telecommunications.

Renewable energy is at the forefront of the changes sweeping Africa, which is registering some of the most remarkable advances in solar, geothermal and wind power. With world leaders due to meet in Paris in December to settle on a new global climate change deal, Africa has a chance to show the way to a low-carbon future – while putting in place the policies needed to reduce its vulnerability to the effects of climate change.

A “triple win” is within the region’s grasp, as renewable technologies create opportunities to increase agricultural productivity, improve resilience to climate change, and contribute to long-term reductions in dangerous carbon emissions.

The Africa Progress Report 2015 explains the bold steps that leaders globally and in Africa must take to achieve this vision. Above all, the report shows that the global climate moment is also Africa’s moment – Africa’s moment to lead the world.

Access the full report @  http://app-cdn.acwupload.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/APP_REPORT_2015_FINAL_low1.pdf

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

The Future Okavango



Over a period of five years (September 2010 – August 2015) 140 researchers from eight countries (Angola, Belgium, Botswana, Brazil, Germany, Namibia, Portugal, South Africa), 23 universities, and additional research institutions – mainly from Angola, Botswana, Namibia, and Germany carried out the integrated transdisciplinary research project ‚The Future Okavango‘ (TFO) within the whole Basin of the Okavango-Cubango. TFO was part of the international research program ‚Sustainable Land Management‘ funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) which again formed a part of the umbrella initiative ‚Research for sustainable development‘ (FoNa). TFO has been faced with the challenge of  analyzing backgrounds and identifying drivers of ecological and social change, with the goal of improving the sustainable use of the natural resources within the catchment. The TFO project aimed to provide data and scientific knowledge, scenarios (narratives based on future projections of various possible developmental pathways), and recommendations which will help to maintain the functioning of the ecosystems, their services, and the well-being of its population. This book is one of the outcomes of this endeavour.

This book is available in the library or access it online @ http://www.future-okavango.org/downloads/TFO_Report_engl_compiled_small_version.pdf
With the global population rising, analysts and policymakers have targeted Africa's vast wet savannas as a place to produce staple foods and bioenergy groups at low environmental costs. But a new report published in the journal Nature Climate Change finds that converting Africa's wet savannas into farmland would come at a high environmental cost and, in some cases, fail to meet existing standards for renewable fuels.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-03-cropping-africa-savannas-high-environmental.html#jCp
With the global population rising, analysts and policymakers have targeted Africa's vast wet savannas as a place to produce staple foods and bioenergy groups at low environmental costs. But a new report published in the journal Nature Climate Change finds that converting Africa's wet savannas into farmland would come at a high environmental cost and, in some cases, fail to meet existing standards for renewable fuels.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-03-cropping-africa-savannas-high-environmental.html#jCp
With the global population rising, analysts and policymakers have targeted Africa's vast wet savannas as a place to produce staple foods and bioenergy groups at low environmental costs. But a new report published in the journal Nature Climate Change finds that converting Africa's wet savannas into farmland would come at a high environmental cost and, in some cases, fail to meet existing standards for renewable fuels.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-03-cropping-africa-savannas-high-environmental.html#jCp
With the global population rising, analysts and policymakers have targeted Africa's vast wet savannas as a place to produce staple foods and bioenergy groups at low environmental costs. But a new report published in the journal Nature Climate Change finds that converting Africa's wet savannas into farmland would come at a high environmental cost and, in some cases, fail to meet existing standards for renewable fuels.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-03-cropping-africa-savannas-high-environmental.html#jCp
With the global population rising, analysts and policymakers have targeted Africa's vast wet savannas as a place to produce staple foods and bioenergy groups at low environmental costs. But a new report published in the journal Nature Climate Change finds that converting Africa's wet savannas into farmland would come at a high environmental cost and, in some cases, fail to meet existing standards for renewable fuels.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-03-cropping-africa-savannas-high-environmental.html#jCp

Monday, August 10, 2015

The Africa Competitiveness Report 2015

The Africa Competitiveness Report 2015 comes out at an auspicious moment for the continent. Africa’s solid average growth rate of more than 5 percent over the past 15 years bears witness to the region’s impressive economic potential. A growing labor force and a large and emerging consumer market hold the promise of significant further growth opportunities. Yet myriad challenges need to be addressed in order to reap these potential gains. Africa’s growth path could be more equitable and broad based. Economies need to shift toward higher value added activities that will provide quality employment opportunities for their growing populations and lay the foundations for sustained growth. Africa has all the ingredients to make this happen, and decisions and actions taken today will determine whether Africa will succeed in achieving higher levels of prosperity. Published on a biennial basis, The Africa Competitiveness  report highlights areas that require policy action and investment to ensure Sustained growth. 

Friday, August 07, 2015

World Water Week 2015

World Water Week 2015 will meet under the theme ‘Water for Development,' with experts, practitioners, decision makers, business innovators and young professionals from a range of sectors and countries coming together to network, exchange ideas, stimulate innovative thinking and develop solutions to water-related challenges. The Week will include 160 events and eight workshops to discuss issues related to financing, the proposed sustainable development goals (SDGs), integrity, gender, climate change, energy, sanitation, food, conflict resolution and water management. World Water Week in Stockholm is an annual event that focuses on current global water issues, and is organized by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI). 2015 is the jubilee year for both the Week and the Stockholm Water Prize.   

Dates: 23-28 August 2015  
Location: Stockholm, Stockholms Lan, Sweden    
Contact: 2015 World Water Week/ MCI Scandinavia AB   
Phone: +46 8 5465 1500   fax: +46 8 5465 1599