Friday, October 31, 2014

Farmers urged to take ownership of human-wildlife co-existence

Rural communities in 13 villages along the Okavango Delta, Chobe–Linyanti and the Makgadikgadi wetlands have been urged to take ownership of a human-wildlife co-existence project through pro-active conflict prevention and skills development.
The calls were made by the project consultants, Kalahari Conservation Society (KCS), during a stakeholder workshop of the Northern Botswana Human Wildlife Coexistence Project (NBHWC) held in Maun.
The project’s activities includes the introduction of chili bush fences, early maturation seed varieties, kraaling and guard dogs to reduce livestock predation as well as beehive fences to prevent damage of crops and livestock killings by elephants and predators respectively.
When delivering her presentation, the Public Relations and Marketing Officer at KCS, Chanana Ntsomeng, said the objectives were to familiarise everyone with the project’s communications strategy and activities and give stakeholders a chance to give feedback on the project. She said another objective is to encourage ownership by Village Project Members.
The Senior Wildlife Biologist in Maun, Mpho Nthomiwa, said the lives of people in the region depended on arable and pastoral farming. “We have challenges of human and wildlife conflict. As growth, they end up encroaching. Reduce conflict; go to co-existence. Challenge for people and wildlife to live in harmony.” He added..
He praised the focal persons in the project for co-operation given to stakeholders, including EcoExist Botswana, who are running parallel research to address human-elephant conflict in ways that may be modeled throughout Botswana. Nthomiwa stated that his department and the two organs have since signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to combat possible clashes with community members. Read more http://www.ngamitimes.com/2014/10/farmers-urged-take-ownership-human-wildlife-co-existence/

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Pirates threaten fishing industry

Illegal fishing in Lake Ngami is a threat to species and local livelihoods and any move against it could spark conflict with Zambia and the DRC.
The Botswana ministry of environment, wildlife and tourism’s failure to crack down on illicit fishing operations in the wetlands of Ngamiland and the Chobe region may result in extinction of species, economic losses, and destruction of livelihoods in the northwest of the country.
Information gathered by the Oxpeckers Centre for Investigative Environmental Journalism suggests that the influx of Congolese and Zambian fishermen at Lake Ngami has left authorities worried about the depletion of resources and environmental challenges that arise at the fishermen’s informal settlements.
Lake Ngami falls at the southwest fork of the Okavango Delta and mostly feeds from the inflows of the delta. The Okavango, one of the largest bodies of inland water, was recently listed under the Ramsar wetlands of global importance by the United Nations.
Along the lake’s shores, fishermen can be seen drying fish and packing it in large consignments ready to be trucked into Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).
A few years ago there were less than 200 fishermen from other countries, but the numbers have exploded to more than 3?000.
Ngami farming communities have appealed to the ministry to suspend fishing at the lake because of a proliferation of squatter camps and the uncontrolled influx of pirate fishermen attracted to Botswana by the booming fishing opportunity on the lake.
Bareetsi Bogaisang, chairperson of the Lake Ngami Fishing Cluster, said the problem had escalated beyond control.
There was a high demand for bream and barbel in Zambia because these species had been overfished in that country, he said.
“The Zambians now come to Botswana and fish in bulk,” said Bogaisang.
“Some even put in orders for 30?000 to 45?000 fish a month – a figure that has increased from about 7?000 a couple of years ago.
“The rising demand has caught us unprepared. This explains the failure to monitor, regulate and protect the trade from this exploitation,” Bogaisang said.
Read more http://mg.co.za/article/2014-10-24-pirates-threaten-fishing-industry

Monday, October 27, 2014

ORI Seminar

You are invited to a presentation by Dr Moren Stone on Thursday, 30th October at 0930hrs in the Seminar room.
The presentation is titled “System thinking perspectives and tourism development : assessing linkages between protected areas, tourism and community livelihoods”.
This presentation will be covering Dr Stone’s area of research which is situated on system thinking approaches.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

BOTSWANA GOVERNMENT GAZZETTE

TENDER INVITATIONS FOR THE NORTH WEST DISTRICT COUNCIL (NWDC)
1. Tender No. NWDC/ELEC.3.2014- Civil and Mechanical Engineering Services (Electrical Division)

Tender offers invited for the electrical wiring and installation works at Legotlhwane Primary School. Pg. 5882, Second Publication.

2. Tender No. NWDC/ELEC/10/2014-Civil and Mechanical Engineering Services (Electrical Division)

Tender offers are invited for the electrification of Gumare, Kelekele and Tubu Primary Schools. Pg. 5883, Second Publication.

3. Tender No. NWDC/ELEC/11/2014-Civil and Mechanical Installation Services (Electrical Division)

Tender offers are invited for the electrical wiring and installation works at Etsha 6 and Etsha 13 Primary Schools. Pg. 5884, Second Publication.

4. Tender No. NDWC/ELEC/12/2014-Civil and Mechanical Engineering Services (Electrical Division)

Tender offers are invited for the electrical wiring and installation works at Shakawe and Mohembo Primary Schools. Pg. 5885, Second Publication.

5. Tender No. NWDC/ELEC/13/2014-Civil and Electrical Engineering Services (Electrical Division)

Tender offers are invited for the electrical wiring and installation works at Nokaneng Primary School. Pg. 5886, Second Publication.

6. Tender No. NWDC/ELEC/14/2014-Civil and Mechanical Engineering Services (Electrical Division)

Tender offers are invited for the electrical wiring and installation works at Matlapana and Tawana Primary Schools. Pg. 5887, Second Publication.

7. Tender No. NWDC/ELEC/15/2014-Civil and Mechanical Engineering Services (Electrical Division)

Tender offers are invited for the electrical reticulation from Government Revenue Feeder Pillar to Blue Block in Rural Administration Center. Pg. 5888, Second Publication.

8. Tender No. NWDC/ELEC/9/2014-Civil and Mechanical Engineering Services (Electrical Division)

Tender offers are invited for the electrical wiring and installation works at Botswelelo and Sekgoma Primary Schools. Pg. 5889, Second Publication.

9. Tender No. NWDC/OK/LS/01/2014 Okavango Sub-District Legal Services, Bye Law Division

Tender offers are invited for supply and installation of CCTV surveillance system to Okavango Sub-District Council. Pg. 5891, Second Publication.

10. Tender No. NWDC/MAA/SEC/01/2014 Legal Services, Bye Law Division

A service contract for the procurement of provision of security services over a period of 12 months at various facilities owned by Maun Administration Authority. Pg. 5927, First Publication.
Volume LII, No. 50 of 5th September, 2014 ISSN 2311-956X

KNOW YOUR LAWS: SUPPLEMENT A-AMENDMENTS OF BW ACTS
Botswana Defence Force (Amendment) Act, 2014-Act No. 19 of 2014……………………………………………..A.105
Presidential Elections (Supplementary Provisions) (Amendment) Act, 2014-Act No. 20 of 2014…….A.107
Judicial Services Act, 2014-Act No. 21 of 2014………………………………………………………………………….A.109-113
Companies (Amendment) Act, 2014-Act No. 22 of 2014…………………………………………………………….A115-117
Botswana Telecommunications Corporations (Transition) (Amendment) Act, 2014-Act No.23 of 2014………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………A119
Counter-Terrorism Act, 2014-Act No. 21 of 2014………………………………………………………………………A.121-142
Chemical Weapons (Prohibition) Act, 2014-Act No. 25 of 2014………………………………………………..A.143-160
Securities Act, 2014-Act No. 26 of 2014…………………………………………………………………………………….A.161-195
Retirement Funds Act, 2014-Act No.27 of 2014…………………………………………………………………………A.197-227
Proceeds and Instruments of Crime Act, 2014-Act No.28 of 2014……………………………………………..A.229-271
Botswana Geoscience Institute Act, 2014-Act No. 29 of 2014……………………………………………………A.273-290
Botswana National Sport Commission Act, 2014-Act No. 30 of 2014…………………………………………A.291-308
Forensic Procedures Act, 2014-Act No. 31 of 2014…………………………………………………………………….A.309-328
Anti-Human Trafficking Act, 2014-Act No. 32 of 2014……………………………………………………………….A.329-343

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

ORI educate farmers on optimal ranch management



The Okavango Research Institute (ORI) hosted a farmers’ workshop on the 4th of September 2014 which was facilitated by Dr Richard Fynn Range Ecologist. The objective of the workshop was to discuss the concept of optimal ranch management and how to implement these strategies.
A key area for research in the Ngamiland region is livestock and rangeland management to serve the important livestock industry of Botswana. Research lead by Dr Fynn both locally and in collaboration with international range ecologists has led to important advancements on optimal strategies for rangeland management that improve livestock production and profitability that includes range improvement.
Dr Fynn presented to farmers improved and profitable ways they could use to run their ranches. He explained how they can increase grass productivity on their ranches, and added that good grazing management practices can increase productivity. He emphasized that grass needs a year to rest after grazing in order to recover optimal nutrients and length. Farmers were encouraged to divide their ranches into two sections, where animals could graze during the dry and wet seasons. They were told that the one section of the ranch should be   left to rest and used as a reserve for the dry season. Dr Fynn explained that this ranch management strategy ensures that animals have food all year round even during the drought season.
He also pointed out that this concept is ideal for rural farmers or farmers with new ranches who cannot afford financial outlays of fencing.  He stated out that this ranching system has been put in place in South Africa and that great results are being experienced with large increases in profitability and improvement of rangeland condition and productivity.
Dr Fynn emphasized that he believes that this rangeland management strategy is the way forward for cattle ranching in Africa, especially where there is a need for the development of low cost and practical ways to implement ranching. It also provides good flexibility for adaptation to more variable and less reliable rainfall under climate change.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Appointment of Prof Masamba as ORI Director!!!

Prof WRL Masamba has been appointed as ORI Director with immediate effect. Lets take this opportunity to congratulate Prof Masamba on his appointment.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Cultural tourism could diversify economy - tribal leader

Kgosi Kebatshwaretse Phetsogang of Mmatshumu in Boteti Sub-District has advocated for the inclusion of cultural tourism in Community Based Natural Resources Management (CBNRM) as a way of diversifying the economy of the country and creating employement.
''I saw it when we had gone on a benchmarking trip to Namibia; young ladies with exposed breasts nipples protuding eye catchingly, wearing their traditional clothes. They just stood there without a word. They had the company of an elderly woman who explained the meaning of their outfit to visitors. Whoever got information or photographed them paid,'' explained Phetsogang in an interview after the launch of Gumakutshaa Trust, a Community Based Organization (CBO) in Letlhakane last week.
He explained that even though the looks of the female body features may be tempting to men, it does not go anywhere near to sex work. These, he said are some of the possible types of tourism CBOs might explore to ensure diversification of projects. His comments followed a presentation by the Department of Wildlife and National Parks Officer, Mmoloki Pule, who had adviced members of the new CBO that was launched that though they are near the Makgadikgadi where Avi Tourism is the most viable, exploring other opportunities was crucial.
Read more in the latest SundayStandard http://www.sundaystandard.info/