Tuesday, May 26, 2015

World Leaders' Conservation Forum 2015


The World Leaders' Conservation Forum (WLCF) will provide a platform for leaders from all sectors of society, including government, business, civil society and academia, to discuss and seek creative nature-based solutions to global environmental, economic, and social challenges. The main theme of this three-day event, organized by the Ministry of Environment of the Republic of Korea, the Jeju Special Self-Governing Province and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), is 'Nature: a path to peace and coexistence'. On Day 1, expert meetings will be held on: reduction of threats to biodiversity; nature conservation for sustainable development; co-existence between humans and nature; and facilitating transboundary conservation and peace building. On Day 2, dialogues will take place on: transboundary conservation and peace building; harmonious coexistence between humans and wildlife; and resilient ecosystems and sustainable development. On Day 3, participants will be invited to visit one World Heritage site, two Ramsar Sites as well as their adjacent local communities.  

Dates: 7-9 July 2015  
Venue: International Convention Center Jeju, 2700 Jungmun-dong, Seogwipo-si, Jeju-do, South Korea   Location: Jeju City, Jeju (Cheju-Do), Republic of Korea 
Contact: World Leaders Conservation Forum 2015 Secretariat 
Phone: +82 2 3475 2645   fax: +82 2 3475 2656  
E-mail: master@wlcf.kr  
www: http://www.wlcf.kr/eng/

Monday, May 25, 2015

ORI Seminar

You are invited to a seminar presentation by Prof Ngwenya and Dr. Ian Tietjen from theUniversity of British Columbia on Monday at 0900 AM in the seminar room.
The seminar is entitled: “Antiviral discovery from pure natural products and traditional medicines”.
Find below Dr Ian Tietjen’s biosketch
Dr. Ian Tietjen is an Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University and a Research Associate in the Department of Anaesthesiology, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver, Canada. He combines genetics, cell biology, drug discovery, and pharmacology to discover new antivirals and characterize antiviral targets, particularly for influenza and HIV. His current research aims to understand the properties of viroporins, or virally-encoded ion channels, and identify small molecules that inhibit them. He is also working to characterize antivirals for HIV and influenza that are derived from pure natural products and extracts with support from traditional medicines.
Dr. Tietjen received his Ph.D. at Harvard University in 2003 under the supervision of Dr. Catherine Dulac, where he developed a novel method to isolate and compare the microarray profiles of single olfactory neurons and their precursors. His postdoctoral training took place from 2003-06 with Dr. Christopher A. Walsh at Harvard Medical School, where he made use of emerging human genomics data, linkage analyses of human pedigrees, and cell culture techniques to identify and characterize novel genes that underlie cerebral cortex patterning, mental retardation, and epilepsy.
In 2006, Dr. Tietjen joined Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. in Vancouver as a Senior Research Scientist. There, he designed and implemented a research program where he sequenced 458 candidate genes of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in 200 individuals with familial forms of extremely high or low HDL cholesterol levels, leading to the discovery of 13 new genes that underlie CVD risk. In 2011, he joined CardiomePharma Corp. as a Group Leader, where he built a cell and molecular biology lab and was responsible for in vitro assay development, team supervision, and independent research. In 2012, Dr. Tietjen returned to academia under the guidance of Drs. David Fedida, Zabrina Brumme, and Mark Brockman to pursue his current projects to target viroporins and explore natural products as antivirals.
 

Friday, May 22, 2015

Greening Africa’s growth corridors could contribute to global Sustainable Development Goals, says IUCN

Building inclusive, resilient, green growth corridors is one way African countries can ensure their ambitious economic agendas support the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), said IUCN at the Global Green Growth Forum (3GF) regional meeting held here 13-14 May.
 
Many African countries, including Mozambique and Tanzania, have created growth corridors to attract investment that will stimulate economic development, job creation, public revenue, and ultimately, contribute to the eradication poverty. By adopting long-term goals for these corridors that promote greater food, energy, water and climate security, as well as enhance livelihoods and well-being, governments will be better positioned to deliver tangible evidence of sustainable growth and development.

Through an innovative programme called SUSTAIN-Africa, IUCN is working with local, national and international partners to demonstrate the benefits of sustainably managed natural resources in these areas. With a particular emphasis on landscape management and restoration, the programme aims to support development of improved and diversified farm, forest and wetland production that links local communities to new business opportunities, fostering green growth throughout the corridor.  



Thursday, May 21, 2015

Library interns


Two library attachés who will be working with us for the next six weeks. The gentleman's name is Thato Kgakge and the lady is Ms. Maduo Sekuni. They are third year students from the University of Botswana studying Library and Information Studies.

Murder accused wants to go to library

A man accused of murder has requested the High Court to order that he should be allowed to visit a library once a week to prepare for his defence. Matshidiso Boikanyo, the only defendant who was denied bail in a case in which he was accused with three others of stabbing to death a cab driver on September 2013 told Justice Bengbame Sechele yesterday that he needs a library to read and learn about his constitutional rights.

“I ask the court that I be taken to the library at least every Monday or every Wednesday. This would help me better prepare for my defence. I need to understand my constitutional rights. I need to thoroughly understand the Penal Code and case law regarding murder,” he said.

“The law also says that after a case like mine has been committed to the High Court I should be released if I have not been tried after spending at least six months in custody. This clause was amended in 2014, but because I have been in prison before it was amended, the law stipulates that the changes should not affect me,” he argued to support his application for bail.

Read more: http://www.mmegi.bw/index.php?aid=51186
Matshidiso Boikanyo, the only defendant who was denied bail in a case in which he was accused with three others of stabbing to death a cab driver on September 2013 told Justice Bengbame Sechele yesterday that he needs a library to read and learn about his constitutional rights.
“I ask the court that I be taken to the library at least every Monday or every Wednesday. This would help me better prepare for my defence. I need to understand my constitutional rights. I need to thoroughly understand the Penal Code and case law regarding murder,” he said.
“The law also says that after a case like mine has been committed to the High Court I should be released if I have not been tried after spending at least six months in custody. This clause was amended in 2014, but because I have been in prison before it was amended, the law stipulates that the changes should not affect me,” he argued to support his application for bail.
- See more at: http://www.mmegi.bw/index.php?aid=51186#sthash.739mYETI.dpuf
Matshidiso Boikanyo, the only defendant who was denied bail in a case in which he was accused with three others of stabbing to death a cab driver on September 2013 told Justice Bengbame Sechele yesterday that he needs a library to read and learn about his constitutional rights.
“I ask the court that I be taken to the library at least every Monday or every Wednesday. This would help me better prepare for my defence. I need to understand my constitutional rights. I need to thoroughly understand the Penal Code and case law regarding murder,” he said.
“The law also says that after a case like mine has been committed to the High Court I should be released if I have not been tried after spending at least six months in custody. This clause was amended in 2014, but because I have been in prison before it was amended, the law stipulates that the changes should not affect me,” he argued to support his application for bail.
- See more at: http://www.mmegi.bw/index.php?aid=51186#sthash.739mYETI.dpuf

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Out of Africa? Texans offer sanctuary to endangered rhinos

In the Texas grassland, home to white-tailed deer and rattlesnakes, outdoorsman Charly Seale sees a vast sanctuary of open spaces that could be used to protect the wild African rhino from its biggest enemy - poachers in search of the animals' valuable horns.


Seale is part of an ambitious project organized by animal welfare groups in the United States and African countries to bring hundreds of orphaned baby southern white rhinos to the south Texas grasslands, whose climate and geography are similar to their native South African veld.

That is if governments will let them and the Texans can afford a transportation bill that could run tens of millions of dollars, all paid for by private donations.

"This is not for the faint of heart or for the faint of checkbook," said Seale, head of the Texas-based Exotic Wildlife Association's Second Ark Foundation, pointing out no public money will be sought for the effort, which is still in its early stages.

Rhino poaching hit a record in South Africa last year, home to almost all the rhinos in Africa, with 1,215 killed in 2014, according to South Africa's Environment Ministry.

Read more: http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/05/19/us-usa-rhino-texas-idUSKBN0O418P20150519

Monday, May 18, 2015

IUCN recommends action for natural World Heritage in danger

Key recommendations by IUCN, International Union for Conservation of Nature, on new and threatened natural World Heritage sites are released today ahead of the World Heritage Committee meeting which takes place in Bonn, Germany from 28 June to 8 July. IUCN recommends that Colombia’s Los Katíos be withdrawn from ‘in-danger’ status. It also recommends inscription for a new site in Jamaica and major extensions to two listed sites in Viet Nam and South Africa. A second batch of reports is due at the end of May.

State of Conservation reports, prepared by IUCN jointly with the UNESCO World Heritage Centre, monitor the condition of World Heritage sites affected by major conservation issues. About a quarter of the 228 natural sites currently listed are being examined this year. The reports released today present recommendations for 27 natural sites, including famous areas such as Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra in Indonesia.

Conservation recommendations for 28 other sites will be issued on 29 May and will include the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, Monarch Butterfly Reserve in Mexico andLake Turkana in Kenya. The World Heritage Committee, made up of 21 member states, will discuss the recommendations and make its decisions next month.
 

Friday, May 15, 2015

Needle in a haystack? Community cultural heritage in wilderness and wildlife tourism environments of southern Africa

 by Dr Susan  Keitumetse

Abtract

Wildlife and wilderness environments currently dominate resources conservation and management models in southern Africa. Therefore plans for protection of natural heritage resources heavily obscure the development of conservation initiatives specific to cultural and heritage resources management, making it inevitable that approaches initiated for natural heritage are directly adopted, rather than adapted, into the management and conservation of cultural heritage resources. In most parts of southern Africa, this adoption is influenced by the need for a diversified tourism product. However, this approach poses a challenge for sustainable development of African cultural heritage because it blurs the development of conservation and management measures that are compatible with cultural and heritage resources and contribute to these resources’ sustainability. This paper highlights this scenario as it occurs in southern Africa, the inherent challenges it brings to the development of sustainable cultural heritage management approaches; and goes further to show how, and why African cultural heritage resources management strategies should strongly pursue approaches that are unique to cultural and heritage resources such as Community-Based Cultural Heritage Resources Management (COBACHREM) model that will create sustainable communities in Africa.

The paper will be presented at a conference in Cambridge Universtity in a conference organised by Centre for Research  in the Arts, Social sciences and Humanities which will be held from today ,15th  May 2015 - 16th  May 2015.

More info about the conference: http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/25667